Halloween: Pin the Face on the Pumpkin & Making Monsters

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Name of Teacher: Laura McGhee

Class/Grade/Language Level: 5th or 6th Grade (can be adjusted for lower grades). Also works well for large classes (tried it with 60 kids at once, it's solid).

Textbook and specific lesson: N/A

Goal: Learn about and enjoy Halloween while practicing simple English

Preparation:

  • Short presentation about Halloween
  • Jack-O-Lantern eyes (4 triangles approx. 1 ft in height), noses (2 triangles approx. 1 foot in height)and mouths (2 mouth-shaped pieces, scale to eyes/nose) out of black foam board with magnets on back.
  • Blindfolds (4 is enough, more is better. Sleeping masks from Daiso work well.)
  • Making monsters worksheet (attached) File:Makeamonsterworksheet.docx
  • Body part cards (1 arm, 1 leg, 1 eye, 1 mouth, 1 ear, 1 tail, 1 horn, 1 head)

Class time: 45 minutes (full)



Introduction to Halloween: (5 minutes)

First, introduce Halloween to the students using pictures (printed or a slideshow) and simple English. Explain to them how Trick or Treat works, what a Jack-O-Lantern is, Halloween monsters, etc. Practice saying “Happy Halloween!” and “Trick or Treat!” Keep it brief.

Pin the Face on the Pumpkin Race (Fukuwarai Race): (15 minutes)

Draw the outline of two large pumpkins on the blackboard. Then attach the black foam board eyes, noses, and mouths in the appropriate places and show the students. Explain that the game is like fukuwarai, but it’s a race! The team near the left pumpkin must put the face on that pumpkin as fast as possible, and the team by the right pumpkin must do the same for that pumpkin. Teach them “up,” “down,” “left,” and “right” so they can give hints to teammates.

Split the class into two teams and have them line up. Have the first four students in each line go and take the face pieces from the board, return to the front of the line and then blindfold themselves. Students go one at a time to put a piece of the Jack-O-Lanterns face on the board. Others can give hints (6th graders can also use “go straight,” “turn right,” etc. from Hi, Friends! 2 lesson four). Once the face is completed, the next four students take the pieces down and try it all again. The first team to have everyone put up a piece wins.

  • You can exclude the racing aspect to simplify for lower grades.
  • You can add a point system for extra competitive classes.

Monster Making: (25 minutes) **I adapted this activity from another Wiki

Pass out the worksheet and have the students write their names in English. Then, tell them to write any numbers from 1-10 next to A-G (any set of numbers is OK). For H, tell them to write a number from 1-3. Once they have finished, it’s time for the surprise… Tell them that these numbers are body parts. A is arms, B is legs, C is eyes, D is mouths, E is ears, F is tails, G is horns, and H is heads. For example, if “6” is written next to A, then the student should draw a monster with 6 arms. Put up body part cards on the blackboard and write A-H next to the appropriate card. In my experience, the students always freak out at this realization, and have a lot of fun drawing their weird monster.

Give them the rest of the time to draw and color their monsters. Circle the room and ask them “How many~?” questions. Ask them questions like this at the end of class, as well. They can finish their drawings at home if needed.