Difference between revisions of "Hot Seat Game (JHS)"

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(Created page with "'''ALT:''' '''Class/Grade/Language Level:''' '''Textbook and specific lesson:''' '''Goal:''' '''Preparation:''' '''Class time:'''")
 
 
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'''ALT:'''  
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'''ALT:''' Sam Zimny
  
'''Class/Grade/Language Level:'''  
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'''Class/Grade/Language Level:''' JHS
  
'''Textbook and specific lesson:'''
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'''Textbook and specific lesson:''' none
  
'''Goal:'''  
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'''Goal:''' practice English conversation
  
'''Preparation:'''  
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'''Preparation:''' list of questions for the kids
  
'''Class time:'''
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'''Class time:'''10 minutes
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The Japanese teacher is the “Keisatsu” and the ALT is the time keeper. Students ask the “hot seat” student one question and then rotate roles after one minute. If the “keisatsu” hears Japanese, he is arrested.
 +
* Groups of six works best.
 +
* A timer is useful.
 +
* Making humorous topics would help warm-up the kids for “Eikaiwa”.

Latest revision as of 00:49, 19 February 2015

ALT: Sam Zimny

Class/Grade/Language Level: JHS

Textbook and specific lesson: none

Goal: practice English conversation

Preparation: list of questions for the kids

Class time:10 minutes

The Japanese teacher is the “Keisatsu” and the ALT is the time keeper. Students ask the “hot seat” student one question and then rotate roles after one minute. If the “keisatsu” hears Japanese, he is arrested.

  • Groups of six works best.
  • A timer is useful.
  • Making humorous topics would help warm-up the kids for “Eikaiwa”.